Sep 29 2016

HiScoreBob

Monster World IV

Monster World IV

Monster World IV (モンスターワールドIV Monsutā Wārudo Fō) is an action-adventure platform game, developed by Westone and released exclusively in Japan by Sega for the Mega Drive in April 1994.

Monster World IV is a mix of action-adventure, platforming and RPG genres, in which the player traverses a 2D landscape fighting a variety of monsters as well as interacting with non-playable characters.

Expanding upon previous games in the series, Asha has the ability to swing her sword upward, downward, and across while in air, depending on which direction is pressed. She can also use her shield in a standing position by holding down.

Asha can summon her pet Pepelogoo to reach areas that she cannot on her own. By holding onto him, she can slow the descent of her jump (via his flying ability) or even perform a double-jump. Pepelogoo can also protect Asha from falling rocks, be used as a platform over lava geysers, and blow out fires that obstruct Asha’s progress.

Equipment upgrades are purchased in the hub town. Armor increases Asha’s pink life heart meter. Shields increase her defense and give her stat defenses to certain elements, such as fire or ice. Swords increase Asha’s attack stats with critical effects depending upon the sword.

Some items cannot be purchased and must be found in the temples and caverns that Asha must explore. Healing medicine will restore Asha’s health or bring her back to life if she has Pepelogoo. Gold bars can be traded with the rich lady in town for in-game currency. And finally, there are 150 life drops hidden throughout the game. Collecting ten will add a blue life heart to the life meter.

Items can be permanently missed. Once an area’s boss is defeated, that area is inaccessible for the rest of the game.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/monster-world-iv/

Sep 29 2016

HiScoreBob

Dahna: Megami Tanjō

Dahna: Megami Tanjō

Dahna: Megami Tanjō (Dahna 女神誕生, Dahna: Goddess’ Birth) is a 1991 platform action game developed by and published by IGS for the Mega Drive exclusively in Japan and South Korea.

The protagonist Dahna is capable of a few attacks: players can use sword combinations with a repeated press of the Attack button while being able to stab enemies above Dahna and enemies below her as Dahna is jumping. Aside from melee combat, Dahna is also capable of using magic spells. Powered by magic orbs from fallen enemies, Dahna’s magic is fueled by a bar that is filled with every orb collected and the spell is determined by how full the bar is. At a small portion of the magic bar Dahna can launch a sideways fire shot while at mid-bar length Dahna can summon a blinding fog. At full bar length, Dahna can summon what is called Thunder Magic, but appears as several downpours of magma. Dahna’s life bar can be filled as Dahna progressively collects more life power-ups, allowing her to take more damage.

Throughout the game, Dahna is capable of riding on the backs of different beasts including a horse, a griffin and a large ogre. The first two creatures allow for a different type of stage progression while the griffon and ogre can unleash unique attacks. The game allows a total of five continues per play with no lives system which makes for a high difficulty level throughout its six stages. It also has a high for its time level of violence as every enemy Dahna killed disappeared in a streak of blood and one end stage boss had to be defeated through constant dismemberment.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/dahna-megami-tanjo/

Sep 29 2016

HiScoreBob

Paper Mario: Sticker Star

Paper Mario: Sticker Star

Paper Mario: Sticker Star, known in Japan as Paper Mario: Super Seal (ペーパーマリオスーパーシール Pēpā Mario Sūpā Shīru), is a 2012 role-playing video game developed by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS console.

The Game features a visual style similar to its predecessors, in which the characters appear as paper cutouts in a 3-Dimensional papercraft Mushroom Kingdom, with landscapes ranging from snowy areas and forests to volcanoes. The story focuses on Paper Mario’s efforts to retrieve the 6 Royal Stickers that have been scattered by Paper Bowser after he attacked the annual Sticker Fest. Paper Mario is accompanied by Kersti, a sticker fairy, who bestows upon Paper Mario the power of stickers.

The player controls Paper Mario as he explores the various locales of the Paper Mushroom Kingdom. A major facet of Sticker Star’s gameplay is the extensive use of collectible stickers, which are used to gain new abilities and progress through the game. The player collects stickers that are found and peeled off from various areas in the environment. The player can also purchase stickers using paper coins or receive them from non-playable characters. The player has limited inventory space, and larger stickers take up more room. Stickers are used both in combat and for interacting with the environment. The player can enter a state called “Paperization” that allows him to place stickers anywhere on the visible overworld to activate certain events. The player can also find real-world objects, such as baseball bats and scissors, that can be turned into special types of stickers, called “Thing Stickers”, which are often needed to solve puzzles in the overworld. For example, a Fan Thing Sticker can be placed in strategic areas in the environment and when activated, creates wind that moves or destroys obstacles.

The turn-based battles in Sticker Star are similar to those in the original Paper Mario game and The Thousand-Year Door, initiated when Paper Mario comes into contact with enemies in the overworld. The player’s available attacks are determined by the stickers currently on hand. For example, possession of the Jump sticker is required for Paper Mario to attack an enemy by jumping on it. Certain kinds of attacks are required depending on the enemy being fought. For example: an enemy wearing a spiked helmet cannot be jumped on and must instead be attacked using a different kind of sticker, like a hammer. Thing Stickers are used to inflict more damage on enemies, and certain types of Thing Stickers are required to make it easier to defeat boss characters. However, each sticker is removed from play after one use; it is necessary for the player to consistently collect new stickers. Unlike the previous 3 games, the player increases his maximum HP and other stats through collection of HP hearts, which give him 5 more heath points and a stronger first attack, instead of gaining experience awarded from winning battles. Bonuses or special events that occur during battles can increase Paper Mario’s attack power or allow him to use a single sticker multiple times.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/paper-mario-sticker-star/

Sep 28 2016

HiScoreBob

Ride to Hell Retribution

Ride to Hell Retribution

Ride to Hell: Retribution is an action-adventure game developed by Eutechnyx and published by Deep Silver.

The player controls Jake Conway from a third-person perspective. The game’s levels generally begin with a motorcycle driving segment in which only forward movement is allowed and obstacles must be avoided by using ramps and powerslides. Impacts and collisions lead to either a checkpoint reset (the screen fades and the player is sent backwards to the last clear stretch of road) or death. Combat can also occur in these segments, consisting of quick-time event melee attacks, shooting from a sidecar while an AI companion drives, or getting close enough to allow an AI companion to shoot.

Main levels generally consist of a mixture of third-person, cover-based shooter and beat-’em-up gameplay. These levels are linear, usually guarded by several lower level enemies with a high ranking Devil’s Hand member serving as the boss enemy at the end. The player can use a variety of guns and melee weapons, as well as throwing knives and dynamite. Unarmed combat actions include guard breaking, countering enemy attacks, context kills with environmental objects, and a quick-time event based instant takedowns. Weapons and ammunition can be scavenged from defeated enemies.

Between levels, the player can roam a small section of Dead End to sell drugs and buy weapons, moves, and motorcycle customization. Notably, despite a large amount of the city being modeled and detailed, any attempts to exit the small playable section results in a fade-reset similar to that of the driving segments. Also notable is that civilian NPCs are animated, but cannot be spoken to or killed, despite the game’s warning against harming such NPCs.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/ride-to-hell-retribution/

Sep 28 2016

HiScoreBob

Mario Slam Basketball

Mario Slam Basketball

Mario Hoops 3-on-3, known in Europe as Mario Slam Basketball and in Japan as Mario Basket 3on3 (マリオバスケ 3on3 Mario Basuke 3on3), is a sports game developed by Square Enix and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS in 2006.

The gameplay of Mario Hoops 3-on-3 is centered on basketball games, structured into tournaments that the player must win in order to progress. The tournament ladder is made with graphics based on the original Super Mario Bros.. Each tournament consists of three games with two halves of two and a half minutes each. The one exception is an extra game with the Final Fantasy team at the end of the final tournament. The player can win a tournament by winning the three games on its ladder.[1] Upon winning, the player is awarded either a gold cup, a silver cup or a bronze cup. These cups correspond with winning by more than 200 points cumulatively across the three matches, 100 points, or simply winning all three games.

The matches feature three players on each side, with characters drawn primarily from Mario and other Nintendo games, as well as characters from Square Enix’s Final Fantasy series. During matches, the Nintendo DS touch control is used for all actions except for movement, which can be handled by the directional pad. The player can also control direction via the touch screen. The top screen of the DS shows the game in 3D, while the bottom screen shows an overhead view of the whole court.[1] Dribbling is performed automatically, but slower if the touch screen is not used actively to dribble.

The player can perform multiple moves, such as stealing the ball and passing, by using gestures on the touch pad. The player shoots by drawing a line forward on the touchscreen. Depending on where the character is and how he/she is moving, the shot will either be a normal shot, a special shot or a slam dunk; these shots give the team different amounts of points. The basketball court contains multiple coin pads, which give the player coins when dribbled on up to a maximum value; when the player makes a shot, their coins are added to their total point score. There are also items which appear on the court; when used they grant the player special moves.

There are two game modes: normal and hard. Hard mode is unlocked after the game is beaten on normal. In addition to the regular tournament game, there is an exhibition mode. In this mode, the player can customize the rules such as the amount of playing time, the number of periods played, and turning items on or off. Local multiplayer is limited to simple minigames, and does not allow for actual basketball matches

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/mario-slam-basketball/

Sep 28 2016

HiScoreBob

Timesplitters 2

Timesplitters 2

TimeSplitters 2 is a first-person shooter video game developed by Free Radical Design and published by Eidos Interactive.

The Game is a first-person shooter that requires players to kill enemies and complete objectives using a variety of weapons and tactics in different predefined scenarios. Armour and health bars on the sides of the screen lower when the player is shot, which can be increased by walking over body armor and medical kits.

The weapons of TimeSplitters 2 include handguns, rifles, submachine guns, shotguns, rocket launchers, a grenade launcher, various explosives, a crossbow, a flamethrower, a fire extinguisher and a brick. They are of many different time periods, from the historical to the futuristic. Some weapons have an alternate fire which activates a feature such as launching a grenade or detonating a remote mine. It is possible to dual wield some weapons.

The main single player portion of TimeSplitters 2 is divided into ten levels. Each level is in a different time period and contains a series of objectives that must be completed. Some objectives are present at the start of the level, while others are added during play. A few levels have secondary objectives, which are not required to complete unless on the normal or hard difficulty setting. Each level includes a single checkpoint in the middle where the player can restart if they die or fail to complete an objective (with the exception of the last level on any difficulty and the fourth level on easy). For each level, the player must choose from three difficulty levels. These difficulty levels not only change the strength of the enemies, but also increase the length of the level by adding additional objectives; for instance, in both easy and normal levels, there are optional secondary objectives, whereas in the hard levels, all secondary objectives are now primary and must be completed. At the end of every level, a time crystal must be recovered. After it is picked up, a time portal will appear which must be entered in order to complete the level. However, this is sometimes made more difficult by TimeSplitters that teleport to the player’s location. In secret places of certain levels, there are cartridges of old school arcade games such as Snake, that can be picked up and played on the player’s Temporal Uplink, the device that normally shows the map of the current level.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/timesplitters-2/

Sep 28 2016

HiScoreBob

Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep

Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep

Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep, known in North America as Endless Ocean: Blue World, and known in Japan as Forever Blue: Call of the Ocean (FOREVER BLUE 海の呼び声 Forever Blue: Umi no Yobigoe) is a scuba diving video game for Wii and the sequel to Endless Ocean, previously released for Wii in 2007.

Adventures of the Deep features improved and more realistic graphics and larger explorable areas than the previous game. Adventures of the Deep allows players to travel to twelve different diving spots around the globe, including new polar and freshwater locations.

The ability to dive with a dolphin as a companion returns from the first game, and players will now also be able to ride them to move quickly through the water. Players can also now sell salvaged treasure, including legendary artifacts for money that can be used to buy items such as new styles of diving suits, items used to decorate their island and private reef, and to help the player to be capable of diving for a longer time and with less risk of receiving damage from hostile creatures, running out of oxygen, or getting lost, among others. The aquarium returns and the player can now walk outside the tanks. Several new areas are introduced, for example with the Marine Life Annex, you can put shore species such as penguins, shorebirds and seals. Another new area is the Small World, where smaller fish and invertebrates can be displayed. Potentially dangerous creatures such as sharks, crocodiles, and electric eels will now elicit a warning for players and may even attack them; players will be able to drive them off using a new tranquilizer-like tool called the Pulsar that can shoot electric charges which calms them down. The Pulsar can also be used to heal any creatures the player finds that are sick or injured.

Adventures of the Deep features a variety of animals, including dolphins, whales, sea lions, penguins, manatees, sharks, sea turtles, and more, with around 400 different species of fish, mammals, birds, invertebrates, reptiles and amphibians. There are also 30 legendary creatures to be found in various regions of the game: a select few play a role in the game’s storyline and can be interacted with at any time afterwards, but most require a special condition to be met before they can be found.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/endless-ocean-2-adventures-of-the-deep/

Sep 21 2016

HiScoreBob

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U are fighting video games developed by Sora Ltd. and Bandai Namco Games, with assistance from tri-Crescendo, and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U game consoles. Despite being similarly titled games, even with almost similar content, the two titles are officially considered the fourth and fifth installments, respectively, in the Super Smash Bros. series of games by creator and game director Masahiro Sakurai.

Like the rest of the series, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U are non-traditional fighting games where players use different attacks to weaken their opponents and knock them out of an arena. The games are crossover titles that feature characters, items, music, and stages from various Nintendo franchises, including Mario, Donkey Kong, Pokémon, Fire Emblem, Kirby, Metroid, Star Fox, The Legend of Zelda, Kid Icarus, and Animal Crossing among others, as well as from several third-party franchises, including Sega’s Sonic the Hedgehog and Bayonetta, Capcom’s Mega Man and Street Fighter, Bandai Namco’s Pac-Man, and Square Enix’s Final Fantasy. New features include having up to eight players fighting at a time on the Wii U version, support for Amiibo, using Miis as playable fighters, post-release downloadable content including additional fighters and stages, and customizable special moves unlockable for every non-DLC character. Some features from previous games in the series were removed, such as the story mode in Brawl.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/super-smash-bros-for-nintendo-3ds/

Sep 19 2016

HiScoreBob

Secret of Mana

Secret of Mana

Secret of Mana, originally released in Japan as Seiken Densetsu 2 (聖剣伝説2?, lit. “Legend of the Sacred Sword 2”), is a 1993 action role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It is the sequel to the 1991 game Seiken Densetsu, released in North America as Final Fantasy Adventure and in Europe as Mystic Quest, and it was the first Seiken Densetsu title to be marketed as part of the Mana series rather than the Final Fantasy series. Set in a high fantasy universe, the game follows three heroes as they attempt to prevent an empire from conquering the world with the power of an ancient flying fortress.

Like many other role-playing games of the 16-bit era, Secret of Mana displays a top-down perspective, in which the player characters navigate the terrain and fight off hostile creatures. The game features three such characters: the hero, the girl, and the sprite, named Randi, Primm, and Popoi outside the initial North American release. The player can choose to control each of the characters at any time; whichever character is currently selected, the other two companions are controlled via artificial intelligence. The game may be played simultaneously by up to three players, made possible by the Super Multitap accessory for the Super NES console. The Virtual Console version of the game supports three-player gameplay via additional GameCube controllers or Classic Controllers.

Each character possesses individual strengths and weaknesses. The hero, while unable to use magic, masters weapons at a quicker rate; the girl is a healer, able to cast restorative and support spells; and the sprite casts offensive magic to damage and impair enemies. Upon collecting enough experience points in battle, each character increases in level and improves in areas such as strength and evasion. The trio can rest in towns, where they can regain hit points or purchase restorative items and equipment. Options such as changing equipment, casting spells, or checking status are performed by cycling through the game’s Ring Commands, a circular menu which hovers over the currently controlled party member. The game is momentarily paused whenever the Ring Commands appear.

Combat takes place in real-time. Located at the bottom of the screen is a gauge that determines the amount of damage done to an enemy when attacking. Swinging a weapon causes the gauge to empty and then quickly recharge, allowing that character to attack at full strength. The party wields eight different types of weaponry: sword, spear, bow, axe, boomerang, glove, whip, and javelin. All weapons can be upgraded eight times, and repeated use of a weapon increases its skill level to a maximum of eight, unlocking a new special attack with each level. Weapons are upgraded with Weapon Orbs, which are found in dungeons or earned by defeating certain bosses. The player takes each Orb to a blacksmith, located in most towns, who uses it to reforge one weapon.

In order to learn magic, the party must rescue spirits known as Elementals. The eight Elementals represent different elements—such as water, earth, and life—and each provides the player with specific spells. Magic has skill levels similar to weapons, but each magic spell costs magic points to cast.

At the start of the game, to reach a destination players must traverse an enemy-infested countryside. Travel may be expedited with Cannon Travel Centers, where the party may be launched to faraway destinations via a giant cannon. Cannon Travel usually requires a fee, but is mandatory to visit other continents later on. Later, the party is given access to Flammie, a miniature dragon which is controlled by the player and able to fly freely across the world, represented by an overworld map. These sequences make use of the SNES’s Mode 7 capability to create a rotatable background, giving the illusion that the ground beneath Flammie is rendered in three dimensions. While riding Flammie, the player may access either the “rotated map”, which presents the world as a globe, or the “world map”, a two-dimensional view of the overworld.

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/secret-of-mana/

Sep 14 2016

HiScoreBob

The Crew

The Crew

The Crew is a 2014 online racing video game set in a large open world map across the United States developed by Ivory Tower and Ubisoft Reflections.

The Crew features an open and persistent world for racing and free-roaming across a scaled-down recreation of the contiguous United States. The map is split into five regions: The Midwest, East Coast, The South, Mountain States, and West Coast. Each region has its own unique geographical features. Six main cities (one in each region, two in the Midwest) are featured in the game: Detroit and Chicago in the Midwest, New York City on the East Coast, Miami in The South, Las Vegas in the Mountain States, and Los Angeles on the West Coast. Various other cities, such as San Francisco, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Santa Fe, Dallas, New Orleans, St. Louis, and Washington D.C., are also featured in the game (other major cities such as Boston, Atlanta, Portland and Philadelphia are not included, however). Over thirty smaller cities and towns line the countryside like Nashville, Norfolk and others. It takes approximately 45 minutes in real time to drive from coast to coast in-game

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.hiscorebob.lu/2016/09/the-crew/

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